Graduate Fall 2019

Course Credits Instructor Schedule
Biological Oceanography 4 Krause M, W (1:25 - 3:15)
Chemical Oceanography 4 Lehrter M, W (9:05-11:00)
Environmental Toxicology 3 Robertson M,W (1:25-2:45)
Marine Chemical Ecology 3 Robertson T, Th (2:00-3:30)
Marine Ecosystem Modeling 3 Lehrter Th (9:30-12:30)
Oceanography and Marine Biology 3 Powers T (9:30-12:30)
Scientific Communication 3 Carmichael T (9:-30-12:30)
Seminar 1 Baker F (9:00-10:00)

Graduate Spring 2020

Course Credits Instructor Schedule
Advanced Marine Ecology 2 Smee Thurs (11a - 1p)
Coastal Fisheries Ecology 3 Baker M,W (3:30-5:00)
Geological Oceanography 4 Wang M,W (1:25-3:15)
Physical Oceanography 4 Dzwonkowski M,W (9:05-11:00)
Physiology and ecology of marine microalgae 3 Krause T, Th, (2:00-3:15)
Seminar 1 Cloyed F (8:00-9:00)

May Session 2020 (May 11-May 22)

Course Credits Instructor Schedule
Biology and Conservation of Marine Turtles (2) UG/G Wibbles M-F (9A-4P)
Coral Reef Biology and Ecology (May 6-22) (4) UG/G Hoadley M-F (9A-4P)
Ecology of the Florida Everglades (2) UG/G Stanton M-F (9A-4P)
Shark and Ray Biology (2) UG/G Drymon M-F (9A-4P)
Shellfish Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico (2) UG/G Walton M-F (9A-4P)

1st Session 2020 (May 25-June 26)

Course Credits Instructor Schedule
Coastal Birds of Alabama (2) UG/G Woodrey TH/F (9A- 11:30A); Lab TH (1P- 4P)
Coastal Wetlands Ecology (4) UG/G Stanton W (1P-4P) TH/F (9A - 12P); Lab TH/F (1P - 4P)
Environmental Applications of GIS (2) UG/G Fleming Th/F (9A-11:30A) Lab TH (1P-4P)
Hurricanes of the Gulf Coast (2) UG/G Blackwell TH/F (9A - 11:30A); Lab TH (1P - 4P)
Intro to Oceanography (4) UG/G DeBose W (1p-4p) TH/F (9A-12P); Lab TH/F (1P-4P)
Marine Behavioral Ecology (4) UG/G Gier M/T/W (9A-12P); Lab M/T (1P-4P)
Marine Botany (4) UG/G Lehman M/T/W (9A-12P); Lab M/T (1P-4P)
Marine Geology (4) UG/G Elliot W (1P-4P) TH/F (9A - 12P); Lab TH/F (1P - 4P)
Marine Mammals (4) UG/G Lewis M/T/W (9A - 12P); Lab M/T (1P - 4P)
Marine Restoration Ecology (2) UG/G Baggett M/T (9A-11:30A); Lab M (1P-4P)
Marine Technical Methods (2) UG/G Dorgan M/T (9A-11:30A) M (1P-4P)
Marine Vertebrate Zoology (4) UG/G Albins W (1P-4P), TH/F (9A-12P); Lab TH/F (1P-4P)

2nd Session 2020 (June 29-July31)

Course Credits Instructor Schedule
Intro to Neurobiology (July 13-July 31) (3) UG/G Strang et al. M-Sat (9A-4P)
Intro To Oceanography (4) UG/G Krause M/T/W (9A-12P); Lab M/T (1P- 4P)
Marine Aquaculture (2) UG/G Stoeckel M/T (9A -11:30A); Lab M (1P - 4P)
Marine Conservation Biology (4) UG/G Baggett M/T/W (9A-12P); Lab M/T (1P-4P)
Marine Ecology (4) UG/G Dorgan W (1P-4P) TH/F (9A-12P); Lab TH/F (1P-4P)
Marine Geology (4) UG/G Minzoni W(1P-4P) TH/F(9A-12P) Lab TH/F (1P-4P)
Marine Invertebrate Zoology (4) UG/G Carmichael M/T/W (9A - 12P); Lab M/T (1P - 4P)
Marine Mammal Health (2) UG/G Deming TH/F (9A-11:30A); Lab TH (1P-4P)
Marine Vertebrate Zoology (4) UG/G Baker W (1P-4P), TH/F (9A-12P); Lab TH/F (1P-4P)
Shark and Ray Biology (2) UG/G Drymon M/T (9A - 11:30A); Lab: M (1P-4P)

Biotic Response to Sea Level Change

Prerequisites: One year of undergraduate introductory science and or consent of the instructor. For graduate credit, a degree in any science field.

This course is an overview of sea-level change over geologic time with emphasis mechanisms of change, evidence of past sea-level changes, and the impact of expected sea-level changes on the marine biosphere. Topics include global climate change and eustasy, tectonically-forced sea-level change, epeiric seas, transgression and regression sedimentology, coastal geomorphology, and marine and coastal habitat change. Field studies emphasize local evidence for sea-level change, habitat shift and reorganization, and human response to changing sea levels, such as community displacement, shoreline stabilization, and beach-fill nourishment. This course is designed for undergraduate and graduate students in the physical and biological marine sciences.

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Intro to Neurobiology (July 13-July 31)

Prerequisites: Introductory Biology.

Students will be introduced to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of marine invertebrates and vertebrates. The following aspects of neurobiology will be covered in lectures and laboratory exercises: neurons and glia; passive properties of neurons; resting potentials; action potentials; synaptic transmission; neurotransmitters and receptors; sensory transduction; muscle innervation and contraction; sensorimotor integration; and neurophysiological bases of behavior. In addition, students will use computer simulations that allow a more in-depth exploration of cellular neurobiology than is possible in standard laboratory classes. Students will be introduced to aspects of molecular biology and its applications to neuroscience. This class will include evening and Saturday sessions. The following are recommended but not required: general chemistry and general physics; or permission of the instructor.

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Intro To Oceanography

Prerequisites: Basic science major.

This hands-on course provides students an opportunity to learn about the physics, chemistry, geology, and biology of the ocean. Students will apply this knowledge first hand by implementing sample collection strategies on board a research vessel during cruises on Mobile Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Through class discussion of recent oceanographic discoveries and core concepts, and learning user-friendly ocean data visualization software, this course will enable students to then interpret oceanographic data collected during their cruises and to create clear and concise presentations.

Typical data collected on board the research vessel will include hydrographic (temperature, pH, salinity, inorganic nutrients, light intensity) and biological (phytoplankton, zooplankton) variables that are collectively processed and visualized. Students should have a laptop equipped with word processing and spreadsheet software.

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Marine Aquaculture

Prerequisites: General Biology required; Ichthyology, Limnology, and Invertebrate Zoology suggested, but not required.

This course will introduce students to techniques in live animal culture with an emphasis on basic principles that can be applied to the culture of any organism for research, display or commercial profit. Topics discussed will include: water chemistry, filtration, production techniques, reproduction and nutrition. This course is also designed to assist students with problem solving and communication skills.

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Marine Biology

Prerequisites: General Biology.

A general survey of marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, the communities they form and the physical and chemical factors that influence them. Field trips include marsh, seagrass, and dune habitats. Sampling from research vessels and laboratory exercises will serve to introduce students to the diversity of marine habitats and organisms. Organisms will be identified using dichotomous keys. Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course. Snorkeling gear is required.

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Marine Conservation Biology

Prerequisites: An introductory class in either marine or general ecology.

This advanced course is open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. This course will explore the major threats to marine biodiversity as well as the pros and cons of the potential solutions to these threats. Students will participate in class discussions on current topics in marine conservation biology and will critically evaluate marine conservation primary literature as well as the viewpoints of the various entities involved in marine conservation issues. In addition, students will participate in field trips that support topics covered in lectures and will demonstrate the application of current principles in marine conservation.

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Marine Ecology

Prerequisites: General Biology.

This advanced course is open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. The class will study marine organisms as they interact with each other and their environment, and examine ecological theories and the experimental basis of our current knowledge. The laboratory will consist of field trips to a wide variety of marine habitats and field problems which will be examined by student teams in small groups. Habitats selected for emphasis include coral reefs, kelp forests, seagrass meadows, the rocky intertidal and deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course. Snorkeling gear is required.

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Marine Geology

Prerequisites: Introductory Geology recommended.

A study of the geology of the ocean basins, with special emphasis on the continental shelves, their sediments and the sedimentary processes at work there with emphasis on the northeast Gulf of Mexico. Field trips will be taken to study beach processes and sediments in Mobile Bay and offshore. Students will be introduced to the following: technical writing; conducting a research project; working as a team member; data management; concepts of marine geology; critical thinking; principles of science (hypothesis testing). Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course.

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Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Prerequisites: Introductory Biology or Zoology.

This course surveys the morphology, natural history and evolutionary relationships of the marine invertebrates. The course includes lectures, laboratory exercises and extended field trips. Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course. Snorkeling gear is required.

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Marine Mammal Health

Prerequisites: 3rd or 4th year undergraduate- completion of Dolphins and Whales or Marine Mammals course; graduate student; or consent of the instructor.

The course will provide an overview of marine mammal stranding response, health assessments and common diseases of bottlenose dolphins, manatees and sea lions. Lectures will be focused on how marine mammals act as sentinels for ocean health, including the effects of oils spills, harmful algal blooms and marine debris on marine mammals. This course requires participation in marine mammal necropsies, which includes hands-on dissection of carcasses, internal organs, blood, and can have foul smells. If you do not think you can handle the necropsy portion of this course, you are encouraged not to register for this course. Due to potential risk of zoonotic disease, you cannot participate in necropsies if you are pregnant or immune compromised. Personal protective equipment will be available and is required. A fieldtrip to an aquarium will provide the opportunity to see medical examinations of dolphins and sea lions, and participation in live and dead marine mammal stranding response will be available on a volunteer basis as opportunities present throughout the course.

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Marine Vertebrate Zoology

Prerequisites: Two semesters of General Biology (or equivalent) and accompanying labs.

Survey of marine fishes, reptiles and mammals, with an in-depth comprehensive treatment of their systematics, zoogeography and ecology. Field and laboratory work will stress the vertebrate fauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico and most of the course will be devoted to fishes. Students completing this course will: 1) have a basic understanding of the biology, ecology, physiology, and systematics of the various marine vertebrate taxa; 2) gain experience in field and lab identification of members of the various vertebrate taxa; and 3) gain experience in collecting various marine and island vertebrate taxa.

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Shark and Ray Biology

Prerequisites: One course in General/Organismal biology (or equivalent).

This course will provide an introduction to the biology of sharks and rays, with special emphasis on regional shark fauna and field techniques. Topics to be covered include chondrichthyan origin, systematics, sensory biology, locomotion, food consumption, osmoregulation, reproductive biology, life history, ecology, fisheries and conservation. Lectures will be supplemented with discussions of papers from the primary literature to familiarize students with current research. In addition, longline and gillnet sampling will provide students with firsthand knowledge of field techniques and local shark identification.

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Coastal Birds of Alabama

Prerequisites: Undergraduate Biology or Zoology.

This course highlights the diverse coastal birdlife of northern Gulf of Mexico. With a focus on the study of avian ecology in the field, this class will include a significant emphasis on the use of both sight and sound as means of field identification. A variety of habitats will be explored, including barrier island nesting grounds, the Mobile-Tensaw River basin, local marshes and other unique coastal habitats. Students will also be introduced to a variety of field ornithology techniques including bird-banding, survey techniques, and monitoring methodologies.

Email questions to msw103@msstate.edu.

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Coastal Wetlands Ecology

Prerequisites: General Biology and Botany or Zoology.

This course will focus on coastal and nearshore wetland areas, with an emphasis on the biogeochemical processes that occur within, and issues that threaten and protect these important resources. Wetlands not only provide critical habitat for many aquatic and semi-aquatic species, they are also important for primary productivity, transformation of nutrients, pollutant removal, as well as providing protection from storm surges and floodwaters. Insight into wetland ecology requires understanding of the unique interactions between biology, chemistry and hydrology.

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Environmental Applications of GIS

Prerequisites: statistics or equivalent course in mathematics

This course consists of learning applied mapping and analysis with GIS and will leverage other geospatial techniques including remote sensing, geovisualization, and spatial analysis with particular emphasis on environmental applications. Students will use the knowledge acquired from readings, guided activities, and instructor demonstrations to apply GIS data including vector and raster spatial data, imagery, maps, and surface models in examinations of contemporary coastal and marine science issues. Students will be exposed to working with spatial information regarding human and natural hazards and disasters, land use and land cover, coastal monitoring, and other relevant data types. Some lecture is required, but this course will emphasize a “hands-on” approach to learning GIS through practical assignments and projects in a computer lab and in the field. Industry-leading ArcGIS software will be used along with exposure to online and open-source technology. 

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Hurricanes of the Gulf Coast

This is an introductory survey course on hurricanes with emphasis on hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico. Topics include: 1) the hurricane problem along the Gulf Coast and a review of some of the infamous Gulf Coast hurricanes of the last 150 years; 2) Atlantic/Caribbean/Gulf hurricane climatology; 3) the effects of El Niño and multi-decadal changes in the Atlantic circulation on hurricane frequency; 4) favorable/unfavorable environments for hurricane development and intensification; 5) hurricane features and structure; 6) hurricane movement and steering mechanisms; 7) coastal and inland effects from landfalling Gulf Coast hurricanes; and 8) Gulf hurricane forecasting (where will the storm go and how strong will it be at landfall). A half-day boat trip along much of the length of Dauphin Island is planned (weather permitting) during the last week of class to inspect the impact of recent hurricanes on this barrier island.

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Intro to Oceanography

Prerequisites: Basic Science Major.

This hands-on course provides students an opportunity to learn about the physics, chemistry, geology, and biology of the ocean. Students will apply this knowledge first hand by implementing sample collection strategies on board a research vessel during cruises on Mobile Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Through class discussion of recent oceanographic discoveries and core concepts, and learning user-friendly ocean data visualization software, this course will enable students to then interpret oceanographic data collected during their cruises and to create clear and concise presentations. Typical data collected on board the research vessel will include hydrographic (temperature, pH, salinity, inorganic nutrients, light intensity) and biological (phytoplankton, zooplankton) variables that are collectively processed and visualized. Students should have a laptop equipped with word processing and spreadsheet software.

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Marine Behavioral Ecology

Prerequisites: Introductory course that covers zoology (either vertebrate or invertebrate).

The course examines how animal behavior is influenced by and interacts with its environment, and the ecological and evolutionary significance of these behaviors in a marine setting. Students will learn principles of behavioral ecology as they relate to marine animals, become familiar with techniques for observing animal behavior and conducting behavioral experiments, and be introduced to methods for collecting and analyzing behavioral data. Snorkeling gear required.

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Marine Biology

Prerequisites: General Biology.

A general survey of marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, the communities they form and the physical and chemical factors that influence them. Field trips include marsh, seagrass, and dune habitats. Sampling from research vessels and laboratory exercises will serve to introduce students to the diversity of marine habitats and organisms. Organisms will be identified using dichotomous keys. Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course. Snorkeling gear is required.

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Marine Botany

Prerequisites: General Biology

A general survey of marine algae (microscopic and macroscopic), as well as salt marsh vegetation, mangroves, seagrasses and maritime forest communities. Lectures will emphasize identification, distribution, structure, ecology and physiology. Extensive overnight field and laboratory work is involved, including the ability to wade and snorkel. Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course. Snorkeling gear is required.

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Marine Geology

Prerequisites: Introductory Geology recommended.

A study of the geology of the ocean basins, with special emphasis on the continental shelves, their sediments and the sedimentary processes at work there with emphasis on the northeast Gulf of Mexico. Field trips will be taken to study beach processes and sediments in Mobile Bay and offshore. Students will be introduced to the following: technical writing; conducting a research project; working as a team member; data management; concepts of marine geology; critical thinking; principles of science (hypothesis testing). Participation in overnight field trips is a part of this course.

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Marine Mammals

Prerequisites: General Biology

This course will cover the evolutionary history, taxonomy/classification, anatomy, physiology, behavior and conservation/management issues of marine mammals (cetaceans, pinnipeds, mustelids, sirenians and the polar bear). In addition, research methods used to study marine mammals will be taught (including field and lab techniques).

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Marine Restoration Ecology

Prerequisites: One year of undergraduate introductory science (preferably including an ecology course) or consent of the instructor.

This course will provide an overview of the scientific and technical principles of marine habitat restoration. We will discuss the role of key ecological concepts in restoration, and the role of restoration in science and society. Students will identify structural and functional components of marine habitats and learn how to design restoration projects and monitoring plans that capture these key components of structure and function. Students will learn to recognize when adaptive management may be needed, and how to formulate strategies to correct or maintain the desired trajectory of restored habitats. Students will also be introduced to the interdisciplinary nature of restoration science, including social, ethical, political and economic aspects. Lectures will be supplemented with primary literature reading assignments. Field trips will allow students to see local restoration sites and learn monitoring techniques used in various habitats (e.g., salt marsh, oyster reef, seagrass bed). This course is designed for undergraduate and graduate students.

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Marine Technical Methods

Prerequisites: General Biology, Chemistry, Physics or equivalent

This course will provide an introduction to different methods of sensing the ocean, including building and testing simple sensors, e.g., temperature and light, using Arduino microcontrollers and software, use of in-struments to collect high-resolution data, and some background on how technology has led to key advances in marine science. The course will be primarily project-based, with students working together to build instruments, learn basic programming skills to control sensors, and going in the field to test instruments and collect environmental data.

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Marine Vertebrate Zoology

Prerequisites: Two semesters of General Biology (or equivalent) and accompanying labs.

A survey of marine fishes, reptiles and mammals, with an in-depth comprehensive treatment of their systematics, zoogeography and ecology. Field and laboratory work will stress the vertebrate fauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico and most of the course will be devoted to fishes. Students completing this course will: 1) have a basic understanding of the biology, ecology, physiology and systematics of the various marine vertebrate taxa; 2) gain experience in field and lab identification of members of the various vertebrate taxa; and 3) gain experience in collecting various marine and island vertebrate taxa.

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Plankton Biology

Prerequisites: Principles and Organismal Biology or equivalent.

This course will examine all classes of plankton: microbial; phytoplankton; and zooplankton, with emphasis on the gelata, copeods and planktonic larvae. At least one field trip will be at night, and one or more trips will take the students offshore. Students will identify plankton, learn how to assay plankton populations using classic filtration and modern imaging and molecular methods. We will discuss invasive species, the microbial loop, ‘Jelly World’ and the mechanisms and implications of explosive jellyfish blooms. Each student will keep a detailed notebook and give a ten-minute presentation on his/her favorite planktonic organism. Texts required, and scientific papers will be used.

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Biology and Conservation of Marine Turtles

Prerequisites: Introductory course in Biology

This introductory course will provide an overview of the biology and conservation of marine turtles. Topics to be covered include the identification, distribution, nesting behavior, migratory behavior, feeding ecology, population biology and genetics, developmental habitats, temperature-dependent sex determination, paleontology and conservation of marine turtles. Students will obtain a detailed knowledge of sea turtle biology; will gain an understanding of why many sea turtle species have become endangered; and how proper management has allowed some populations to recover. The course will culminate with an overnight, multi-day field trip to sea turtle nesting beaches and foraging grounds in the southeastern U.S. The class will also visit sea turtle research and rehabilitation facilities. The overnight field trip will provide students with the opportunity to observe loggerhead, green, and leatherback turtles in their natural habitats. 

*Special fees apply and will be determined based on enrollment (approximately $625.00). A trip deposit (1/2) will be due on March 08, 2020, with the remaining portion due on April 29, 2020. The fee is nonrefundable unless the class is canceled.

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Coral Reef Biology and Ecology (May 6-22)

Prerequisites: 2 semesters of general biology or equivalent required, general ecology course recommended.

Students will learn about the biology and ecology of coral reef and associated systems located throughout the Florida Keys. This course will explore the ecology and evolution of coral reef communities, with a view to understanding what is happening on reefs today. Lectures will cover energy flow across reefs, along with biogeochemical cycling important for continual reef development. Microbial interactions that govern the flow of carbon and nitrogen through coral reefs will also be discussed. Formal lectures will be accompanied by lab activities in the field designed to fully immerse students into each topic. Students will also work together to develop a research question focused on tropical marine ecology and then design and execute an experimental approach to answer the proposed question.


*Special fees apply and will be determined by the number of participants in the course (approximately $900.00). A trip deposit (1/2) is due on March 08, 2020, with the remaining portion due on April 29, 2020. The fee is nonrefundable unless the class is canceled. Email questions to khoadley@disl.edu.

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Dolphins and Whales

Prerequisites: General Biology

This class will be an introduction to the biology of cetaceans (toothed and baleen whales). Topics covered will include evolution, taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, genetics, behavior, and conservation related to species within this Order. Lab exercises will introduce current methods used in cetacean research.

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Ecology of the Florida Everglades

Prerequisites: Undergraduate Biology, Zoology, or Botany.

This course examines the natural history and ecology of the world’s rarest and most endangered wilderness area. The course will consist of a week of lectures and discussions focusing on the history, geology, hydrology, and biota of this system, and then a week of field exploration to examine the Everglades and associated systems. The field component will consist of day-long excursions and tent camping in several Florida State Parks. As such, participants should bring appropriate gear and be prepared to actively and cheerfully participate.

*Special fees apply and will be determined by the number of participants in the course (approximately $575.00). A trip deposit (1/2) is due on March 08, 2020, with the remaining portion due on April 29, 2020. The fee is nonrefundable unless the class is canceled. Email questions to lstanton@uwa.edu.

Please view our video of the 2014 class. 
 

The Ecology of the Florida Everglades, Summer 2014 from Trois Clare on Vimeo.

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Shark and Ray Biology

Prerequisites: One course in general/organismal biology (or equivalent).

This course will provide an introduction to the biology of sharks and rays, with special emphasis on regional shark fauna and field techniques. Topics to be covered include chondrichthyan origin, systematics, sensory biology, locomotion, food consumption, osmoregulation, reproductive biology, life history, ecology, fisheries and conservation. Lectures will be supplemented with discussions of papers from the primary literature to familiarize students with current research. In addition, longline and gillnet sampling will provide students with firsthand knowledge of field techniques and local shark identification.

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Shellfish Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico

Prerequisites: One year of college-level Biology or permission of instructor.

This course will provide students with an overview of the various types of shellfish aquaculture practiced in the Gulf of Mexico, both for public stock enhancement and private production. Students will gain a broader understanding of the scale and methods of oyster aquaculture, including cultching, on-bottom and off-bottom methods, as well as clam aquaculture, with field trips to operations in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Students will get an overview of shellfish hatchery production and techniques. This course is also designed to assist students with problem solving and communication skills.

*Special fees apply and will be determined based on student enrollment in the course (approximately $385.00). A trip deposit (1/2) is due on March 08, 2020 with the remaining portion due on April 29, 2020. Fee is nonrefundable unless the class is canceled.

More videos to check out:

  1. The gospel of the Alabama oyster. 5/15/15/ 8:32 video, produced by Southern Foodways Alliance. https://vimeo.com/131098257
  2. For the love of oysters: Alabama’s oyster farmers. 12/19/14. 10:12 video, produced by Backforty Beer Co.http://youtu.be/ewIUJ6rne_Y
  3. Oyster farming grows market (Part 1). 4/4/13. 2:22 video, produced with Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium & Gary Finch Outdoors, and aired on Gary Finch Outdoors. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXyGad22cx8.
  4. Oyster farming grows market (Part 2). 4/5/13. 2:16 video, produced with Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium & Gary Finch Outdoors, and aired on Gary Finch Outdoors. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wrs1ujcl9ao.

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Advanced Marine Ecology

Prerequisites: Introductory ecology or marine ecology course

This graduate level course will improve your understanding of ecological processes by building upon the foundations provided in introductory ecology classes.  Emphasis will be placed on the mechanisms that control the distribution of plants and animals at scales ranging from the individual organism to the ecosystem.  Assigned readings from the scientific literature will cover the entire range of marine habitats and will reflect recent thinking on the major concepts and problems in ecological theory.

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Coastal Fisheries Ecology

Coastal ecosystems around the world support a tremendous diversity of life. One of the most widely recognized values of these systems is their support of fisheries, particularly through their role as nursery grounds. This course will take an in-depth examination of the functioning and value of coastal systems in supporting fisheries. 

The goal of the course is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the functioning and value of coastal systems in support of fisheries. In-class lectures, readings, and discussions, together with field and lab exercises, will highlight the complexity of these systems; the importance of life-cycle migrations, food web dynamics, connectivity, as well as the history of the field and emerging threats to ecosystem function. 

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Geological Oceanography

Geological oceanography or "marine geology" is a broad subject dealing with components of mineralogy, sedimentology, geophysics, and plate tectonics. 

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Physical Oceanography

Requirements: Admission to the graduate program in Marine Sciences.

Physical properties and circulation of the worlds oceans. Topics to be covered include: basic physical laws; properties of heat, water, and salt budgets; waves; tides; large and small scale circulations; sea-level fluctuations; interactions of the sea with the atmosphere and land masses; light and acoustics.

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Physiology and ecology of marine microalgae

Requirements: Admission to the graduate program in Marine Sciences.

This course will cover the acclimative responses of marine microalgae to variability in light, nutrients, temperature and other environmental factors. Stress responses that are engendered when variability in these environmental factors exceeds the organisms' acclimative capacity will also be covered. The course will emphasize the commonality of these processes across taxa as well as considering taxonspecific responses that allow different groups to exploit their niches. Methods such as molecular biology, active fluorescence and remote sensing that can be used to investigate population dynamics and growth over a range of spatial and temporal scales will be covered.

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Seminar

Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in Marine Sciences.

Students and faculty meet weekly in an interactive discussion of current literature in marine sciences. The focus will be on state-of-the-art theories and methodologies as they occur in the primary marine literature in pursuit of the research degree, students will learn to critically review the approaches, analyses and interpretations of scientific research with the tutelage of the faculty. This sem hrsinar will link the inter-disciplinary components of the students and faculty in a stimulating and interactive manner.

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Biological Oceanography

Prerequisites: Graduate student status in one of the physical or biological sciences departments. Special considerations to other students may be granted with the instructor's and the student's departmental chairperson.

Biological oceanography is an 'earth science' that focuses on patterns and processes that are of consequence to the interaction of organisms and the sea. Biological oceanography encompasses both pelagic and benthic environments, however, some specialized shallow marine environments are beyond the usual scope of oceanographic study (e.g., littoral zone and coral reefs). In this course, the student will be introduced to not only our current understanding of biological oceanographic processes, but to the historical perspective of how this understanding came to be. This will be accomplished through weekly reading assignments of the primary literature - discussion of these papers will be integrated into the lecture. Students will participate in basic experimental and descriptive biological oceanography - these exercises are intended to provide the student with some of the fundamental tools and procedures in use by biological oceanographers. These tools cut across other disciplines such as chemistry, physics and geology.

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Chemical Oceanography

Prerequisites: Admission to graduate program in Marine Science.

An in-depth examination of the chemistry of seawater and its relationship with biological, geological and physical processes in the oceans. Coverage of seawater composition, buffering capacity, redox potential, and photochemistry will form the basis for an in-depth analysis of the dynamic equilibria of gases, organic materials, nutrients and trace elements in the sea.

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Environmental Toxicology

Introduction to the scientific and technical principles of toxicological processes in the context of the ecosystem. Students will understand the types of major environmental toxicants and how to properly evaluate their toxicity and factors that influence toxicity. Students will recognize and coherently formulate risk assessment and by using the tools and techniques acquired

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Marine Chemical Ecology

This course deals with how naturally occurring small molecules regulate inter-organismal interactions. The course integrates ecological and evolutionary theories, population and behavioral ecology, and natural product chemistry, with special emphasis towards chemical defenses and communication in marine organisms. Through discussions, we will look at some of the molecular components and downstream physiological responses of the organisms involved. We will touch on the technologies and techniques available for biodiscovery based research in this area along with potential applications. 

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Marine Ecosystem Modeling

An introduction to the principles, tools, and applications of marine ecosystem modeling. Emphasis will be placed on biological and physical coupling and numerical representation of these processes. Students will develop facility with numerical tools and learn how to apply coupled models to their ecosystem of interest.  

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Oceanography and Marine Biology

Oceanography is an interdisciplinary science at the intersection of geology, chemistry, physics and biology. This course is designed to be a survey course of these four disciplines with special emphasis on the biological aspects of ocean sciences. In-class lectures will provide the students with the foundation to understand the principles discussed, and will be supplemented with discussion of the modern ways in which these disciplines are pursued.

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Scientific Communication

Requirements: Admission to the graduate program in Marine Sciences.

Instruction on the principles of scientific communication and opportunities to practice different forms of written and oral communication common to marine and other sciences. Topics include: 1) the rationale for scientists to communicate effectively, 2) how to identify and share information to different audiences, 3) successful scientific date presentations, 4) writing, editing, publishing, and reviewing abstracts, scientific papers, and proposals, and 5) biases in scientific communication.

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Seminar

Students and faculty meet weekly in an interactive discussion of current literature in marine sciences. The focus will be on "state-of-the-art" theories and methodologies as they occur in the primary marine literature. Student presentation is required to receive credit.

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